powershellscripts.com

Tutorials  PowerShell Cmdlet Help for Test-Path



NAME
Test-Path

SYNOPSIS
Determines whether all elements of a path exist.

SYNTAX
Test-Path [-LiteralPath] [-Credential ] [-Exclude ] [-Filter ] [-Include
] [-IsValid] [-PathType {Any | Container | Leaf}] [-UseTransaction] []

Test-Path [-Path] [-Credential ] [-Exclude ] [-Filter ] [-Include g[]>] [-IsValid] [-PathType {Any | Container | Leaf}] [-UseTransaction] []


DESCRIPTION
The Test-Path cmdlet determines whether all elements of the path exist. It returns TRUE ($true) if all elements exi
st and FALSE ($false) if any are missing. It can also tell whether the path syntax is valid and whether the path le
ads to a container or a terminal (leaf) element.


PARAMETERS
-Credential
Specifies a user account that has permission to perform this action. The default is the current user.

Type a user name, such as "User01" or "Domain01\User01". Or, enter a PSCredential object, such as one generated
by the Get-Credential cmdlet. If you type a user name, you will be prompted for a password.

This parameter is not supported by any providers installed with Windows PowerShell.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? true (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters? false

-Exclude
Omits the specified items. The value of this parameter qualifies the Path parameter. Enter a path element or pa
ttern, such as "*.txt". Wildcards are permitted.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? false
Accept wildcard characters? false

-Filter
Specifies a filter in the provider's format or language. The value of this parameter qualifies the Path paramet
er. The syntax of the filter, including the use of wildcards, depends on the provider. Filters are more efficie
nt than other parameters, because the provider applies them when retrieving the objects rather than having Wind
ows PowerShell filter the objects after they are retrieved.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? false
Accept wildcard characters? false

-Include
Tests only the specified paths. The value of this parameter qualifies the Path parameter. Enter a path element
or pattern, such as "*.txt". Wildcards are permitted.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? false
Accept wildcard characters? false

-IsValid []
Determines whether the syntax of the path is correct, regardless of whether the elements of the path exist. Thi
s parameter returns TRUE if the path syntax is valid and FALSE if it is not.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? false
Accept wildcard characters? false

-LiteralPath
Specifies a path to be tested. Unlike Path, the value of the LiteralPath parameter is used exactly as it is typ
ed. No characters are interpreted as wildcards. If the path includes escape characters, enclose it in single qu
otation marks. Single quotation marks tell Windows PowerShell not to interpret any characters as escape sequenc
es.

Required? true
Position? 1
Default value
Accept pipeline input? true (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters? false

-Path
Specifies a path to be tested. Wildcards are permitted. If the path includes spaces, enclose it in quotation ma
rks. The parameter name ("Path") is optional.

Required? true
Position? 1
Default value
Accept pipeline input? true (ByValue, ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters? false

-PathType
Tells whether the final element in the path is of a particular type. This parameter returns TRUE if the element
is of the specified type and FALSE if it is not.

Valid values are:
-- Container: An element that contains other elements, such as a directory or registry key.

-- Leaf: An element that does not contain other elements, such as a file.

-- Any: Either a container or a leaf.Tells whether the final element in the path is of a particular type. Retur
ns TRUE if the element is of the specified type and FALSE if it is not.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? false
Accept wildcard characters? false

-UseTransaction []
Includes the command in the active transaction. This parameter is valid only when a transaction is in progress.
For more information, see about_Transactions.

Required? false
Position? named
Default value
Accept pipeline input? false
Accept wildcard characters? false


This cmdlet supports the common parameters: Verbose, Debug,
ErrorAction, ErrorVariable, WarningAction, WarningVariable,
OutBuffer and OutVariable. For more information, type,
"get-help about_commonparameters".

INPUTS
System.String
You can pipe a string that contains a path (but not a literal path) to Test-Path.


OUTPUTS
System.Boolean
The cmdlet returns "True" when the path exists and "False" when it does not.


NOTES


The cmdlets that contain the Path noun (the Path cmdlets) manipulate path names and return the names in a conci
se format that all Windows PowerShell providers can interpret. They are designed for use in programs and script
s where you want to display all or part of a path name in a particular format. Use them like you would use Dirn
ame, Normpath, Realpath, Join, or other path manipulators.

You can use the Path cmdlets with several providers, including the FileSystem, Registry, and Certificate provi
ders.

The Test-Path cmdlet is designed to work with the data exposed by any provider. To list the providers available
in your session, type "Get-PSProvider". For more information, see about_Providers.


-------------------------- EXAMPLE 1 --------------------------

C:\PS>test-path -path "C:\Documents and Settings\NicoleH"


Description
-----------
This command tells whether all elements in the path exist, that is, the C: directory, the Documents and Settings di
rectory, and the NicoleH directory. If any are missing, the cmdlet returns FALSE. Otherwise, it returns TRUE.





-------------------------- EXAMPLE 2 --------------------------

C:\PS>test-path -path $profile

C:\PS>test-path -path $profile -IsValid


Description
-----------
These commands test the path to the Windows PowerShell profile.

The first command determines whether all elements in the path exist. The second command determines whether the synt
ax of the path is correct. In this case, the path is FALSE, but the syntax is correct (TRUE). These commands use $p
rofile, the automatic variable that points to the location for the profile, even if the profile does not exist.

For more information about automatic variables, see about_Automatic_Variables.





-------------------------- EXAMPLE 3 --------------------------

C:\PS>test-path -path "C:\CAD\Commercial Buildings\*" -exclude *.dwg


Description
-----------
This command tells whether there are any files in the Commercial Buildings directory other than .dwg files.

The command uses the Path parameter to specify the path. Because it includes a space, the path is enclosed in quote
s. The asterisk at the end of the path indicates the contents of the Commercial Building directory. (With long path
s, like this one, type the first few letters of the path, and then use the TAB key to complete the path.)

The command uses the Exclude parameter to specify files that will be omitted from the evaluation.

In this case, because the directory contains only .dwg files, the result is FALSE.





-------------------------- EXAMPLE 4 --------------------------

C:\PS>test-path -path $profile -pathtype leaf


Description
-----------
This command tells whether the path stored in the $profile variable leads to a file. In this case, because the Wind
ows PowerShell profile is a .ps1 file, the cmdlet returns TRUE.





-------------------------- EXAMPLE 5 --------------------------

C:\PS>test-path -path HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\ShellIds\Microsoft.PowerShell

TRUE

C:\PS> test-path -path HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\ShellIds\Microsoft.PowerShell\ExecutionPolicy
FALSE


Description
-----------
These commands use the Test-Path cmdlet with the Windows PowerShell registry provider.

The first command tests whether the registry path to the Microsoft.PowerShell registry key is correct on the system
. If Windows PowerShell is installed correctly, the cmdlet returns TRUE.

Test-Path does not work correctly with all Windows PowerShell providers. For example, you can use Test-Path to test
the path to a registry key, but if you use it to test the path to a registry entry, it always returns FALSE, even
if the registry entry is present.






RELATED LINKS
Online version: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=113418
about_Providers
Convert-Path
Split-Path
Resolve-Path
Join-Path